• Virginia Bodman

    Date posted: February 18, 2011 Author: jolanta
    Virginia Bodman’s paintings and drawings investigate, and give form and presence to ideas about the nature of memory, absence, and exile. Her current work centers on notions of remembrance and celebrates the durability and communicativeness of “things.” She uses a rich mix of visual material drawn from heraldry, nature, 19th-century paintings, and arcane domestic paraphernalia. Ideas and images from different times and spaces elide, form alliances, and find powerful form through the act and means of making—the use of mark, the rhythm of brush strokes, the color and physicality of the paint. She works on a large scale. The paintings surround the viewer with the sensuous presence of color and “stuff.”

    Virginia Bodman 

    Courtesy of the artist.

    Virginia Bodman’s paintings and drawings investigate, and give form and presence to ideas about the nature of memory, absence, and exile. Her current work centers on notions of remembrance and celebrates the durability and communicativeness of “things.” She uses a rich mix of visual material drawn from heraldry, nature, 19th-century paintings, and arcane domestic paraphernalia. Ideas and images from different times and spaces elide, form alliances, and find powerful form through the act and means of making—the use of mark, the rhythm of brush strokes, the color and physicality of the paint. She works on a large scale. The paintings surround the viewer with the sensuous presence of color and “stuff.”

    Works on paper are a crucial and important part of Bodman’s studio practice. A body of collages and drawings accompany each large painting. These vary from tiny sketchbook doodles to extensive groups of full-sheet works. Images are layered, and sometimes obscure each other revealing disconcerting hybrids and unexpected juxtapositions. These works on paper are constantly in dialogue with the large canvases. This conversation between drawing in its widest sense, and painting, continues to be essential to the success of the work.

    Bodman’s work in We Love New York? gives form and presence to memories of heritage and archaic domestic paraphernalia. The sweet design of English chintz into the images are gutsy and strong. The work reveals the possibility of a hidden political agenda through connections with “English” design, fragmented and mechanically reproduced.

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