• The Nowhere Place

    Date posted: December 3, 2009 Author: jolanta
    In an age when visual information runs rampant, does the explosion of knowledge mean that people’s spiritual life becomes richer or poorer? With the change of pictures, do memories and experiences become more uncertain and more difficult to discern?

    Found Museum

    In an age when visual information runs rampant, does the explosion of knowledge mean that people’s spiritual life becomes richer or poorer? With the change of pictures, do memories and experiences become more uncertain and more difficult to discern? With the thick forest of cemented buildings and the endless urban sprawl, have we long lost the space for thought and poetry, nothing left but the ceaseless pursuit for profits and the aimless hustle and bustle for a living? If what we see in crowded streets and cemented buildings is the fall of our body, then where is our soul? It is suspending, just like the duckweed, rootless.

    Over the past 15 years Ma Han has always kept his subject matters and target objects associated closely with the spiritual effect of rapid urbanization on contemporary man. In the exhibition Permeating: A Visual Experience with No Place to Hide Ma projects his viewpoints on ethical and moral principles concerning fairness and justice in the control and distribution of mankind’s resources and wealth, using a completely new visual form to make people conscious of their state of mind where they find no place to hide.

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