• Surfacing Subconscious

    Date posted: August 25, 2010 Author: jolanta
    I feel that my art is an uninhibited territory for me. It’s kind of like pulling the dinner table cloth from under expensive porcelain, and watching a big colorful mess taking place, playing with the velocity of time and watching the different stages of a creative disarray. While on a still frame, all stages look almost neat and coherent, it’s that brute result by innocently curious means and forces, that drives me to explore different visual directions. Drawing, to me, maintains that type of primal expression, the direct contact and modulation of the duct of the line that it allows me to have, and at the same time it’s always new, always now, and always extremely versatile. Drawing is always there, even if it’s somewhere underneath, or never even materialized.

    Lea Rasovszky

    Lea Rasovsky, Come Back To Me Dreamboy No. 3. Courtesy of the artist.

    I feel that my art is an uninhibited territory for me. It’s kind of like pulling the dinner table cloth from under expensive porcelain, and watching a big colorful mess taking place, playing with the velocity of time and watching the different stages of a creative disarray. While on a still frame, all stages look almost neat and coherent, it’s that brute result by innocently curious means and forces, that drives me to explore different visual directions.

    Drawing, to me, maintains that type of primal expression, the direct contact and modulation of the duct of the line that it allows me to have, and at the same time it’s always new, always now, and always extremely versatile. Drawing is always there, even if it’s somewhere underneath, or never even materialized. It’s more of a perpetual, conceptual state in which I find myself. Even the works that look more like paintings, I tend to call them drawings because I almost always like to leave the underwire showing, the little funky skeleton beneath.

    The same goes for the subject. I construct my work around many layers, some apparently ironic and skin-deep, and others with profound connections to my own very private experiences. They are always intertwined, and their succession never follows a strict pattern. The area in which I find my subject matter includes the oddity sector of psychological and physical typologies, the dream kings that are cleverly camouflaged in our everyday life, verbal and visual ironies, the profoundly human with all its intricate emotions and Freudian slips.

    Most of the time I feel the need for characters, faces. To me, there are always faces behind notions and concepts. I’m just picking them out of a crowd. Writing and text are also a very important component of the whole body of works. I feel the need for words as a subtle hint towards the main idea of each work that I never try to fully reveal.

    When possible, more specifically in alternatives to the white cube type of exhibiting space, I like to integrate my works, paintings and/or drawings, in installations, extending their “force field.” When I start working on something I usually picture it in context, in a room, and surrounded by certain objects, so I like to extend the conceptual medium to the exterior surrounding.

    All around, my works are thoughts and emotions turned from the inside out, like you would a stuffed teddy bear.

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