• Ryan Graeff at Ghettogloss

    Date posted: February 18, 2008 Author: jolanta

    Ghettogloss serves the community. Beginning as a contemporary art gallery, art rental house and boutique, Ghettogloss expanded into a community-based staple of the alternative art culture in Los Angeles. With a name that says it all, Ghettogloss has always strived to keep the art of the streets in a fine art market and has always been a supporter of the gloss of the ghetto, the urban art of graffiti and silkscreen.

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    Ghettogloss Gallery

    Ryan Graeff is a Los Angeles-based artist. His exhibition House of Graeff will be on view at Ghettogloss Gallery in Los Angeles March 15–April 20.

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    Ryan Graeff. Courtesy of Ghettogloss Gallery.

    Ghettogloss serves the community. Beginning as a contemporary art gallery, art rental house and boutique, Ghettogloss expanded into a community-based staple of the alternative art culture in Los Angeles. With a name that says it all, Ghettogloss has always strived to keep the art of the streets in a fine art market and has always been a supporter of the gloss of the ghetto, the urban art of graffiti and silkscreen.

    Ghettogloss is known amongst many as the best graffiti galleries in Los Angeles. The Ghettogloss bathroom is famous for it, as the walls are covered ceiling to floor with the tags of many famous street artists as well as young budding graffiti kids. With the coolest urban setting and a street credibility to match, Ghettogloss has supported and given first shows to many famous graffiti artists including the biggest and most infamous Graffiti collective in the world, known as The Seventh Letter.

    Ever since it opened, it has been looking for an artist that represents the vision and aesthetic of Ghettogloss. After six years in the contemporary L.A. art scene, its owner and director have finally found one. With a new take on urban street graffiti, Ryan Graeff is in the process of changing art and pop culture in a multi-media world.

    From bombing the streets of this nation with a wheat paste icon named “Bandit” to hand silkscreening over a dozen volumes of urban-coated, texture-saturated, color-enriched newspapers called “The Restitution Press,” Graeff gets around. Based in his warehouse studio in downtown L.A., Graeff is a full time artist by day, and a slave to bombing the streets by night.

    With his “Bandit" image, a band called The 1990s, the newest pop craze out of London, has worn Graeff’s latest t-shirt line. His art is featured on the big screen in Will Smith’s upcoming film, Hancock. Graeff is loved by collectors, fellow artists, and celebrities alike. He has a large following including Tim Armstrong 

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