• Rotem Reshef

    Date posted: September 22, 2010 Author: jolanta

    My painting is intuitive, driven and inspired first of all from color.

    My painting is intuitive, driven and inspired first of all from color. Color is my first motivation to paint, the incentive for visual expression, the basic manifestation of my inspiration and the catalyst for refining emotions and feelings into a painting, a micro-cosmos of a personal experience projected outside.

    Most of my paintings are abstract, yet many hints of figuration, mostly organic, optic or nature oriented, can be seen and found in them. The paintings aim to capture a moment in time both on visual and emotional levels. Thus, they can be explored and experienced both perceptually and through the heart.

    My paintings send an open invitation to investigate them as well as their process of production; the spectator is expected in a sense, to go behind the scenes. Sometimes it is the emotional experience of the viewer that may be the strongest motivation, sometimes it is the mystery of the technique and sometimes it is the story captured in the painting that can be revealed and explored by its seer.

    Creating is almost always an ongoing journey of discovery and development. For me, it is at most times a joyous and always an intimate process involving the materials, the setting and myself. While I create the setup, write the script, gather the cast, conduct the participants and eventually write the critique, randomness is part of the process: the brush strokes and the flow of liquid paint on the damped canvas derive from my inspiration as well as from the physics of movement and the chemistry principles of compounding and decomposition.

    Many artists have been my source of inspiration over the years. Among the painters that I love most are Mark Rothko, for creating fantastic worlds with color that enable the spectator a possibility of traveling at one’s own will; Morris Louis, for his large scaled ravishing canvases in which intense colors are absorbed and drip only partly controlled; Matisse for his majestic color scheme, the flattening of images and the “sounds” that one can hear in his works; and Lea Nickel, an Israeli artist, for her uniquely sweeping color compositions.

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