• Melanie Prapopoulos

    Date posted: March 25, 2008 Author: jolanta

    "As well as the meta-physical, which is so often the retreat of the artist, there is color and movement, warmth, humor, and a kind of illustrative conformity that references both the past and present trends of the visual arts."

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    Melanie Prapopoulos

    Jill Smith

    Melanie Prapopoulos’ work was on view at Broadway Gallery in December 2007 in a solo exhibition entitled Through Her Eyes.

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    Courtesy of the artist.

    Melanie Prapopoulos’ innovatively installed exhibition, Through Her Eyes at Broadway Gallery was a surprising and imaginative treat. The ambience at the opening was lively and vivacious. Born Europe, but raised in the US, Melanie Prapopoulos is the true definition of an international artist. In keeping with this multicultural outlook, much of her work draws from diverse cultural influences. From traditional Latin American, African, and ancient Greek artistic traditions to Impressionism and Abstract Expressionism, her work could be described as Neo-Primitivist. Working both abstractly and figuratively, she evinces a spiritual energy that is direct and simple. Her figurative works are executed mainly in charcoal, pastel, and ink, while her abstractions are implemented in the fluid and unstructured medium of acrylic paint.
       

    What does exist within the exhibition is a vitality and rigor that is descriptive of a body of work reaching far beyond the confines of reality. As well as the meta-physical, which is so often the retreat of the artist, there is color and movement, warmth, humor, and a kind of illustrative conformity that references both the past and present trends of the visual arts. The ingenuity of Prapopoulos is certainly part of the reason why the exhibition is so engaging.
       

    The most exciting element of the exhibition was the installation of images encased in plexiglass and suspended from the ceiling. These hovering compositional constructions transcend the space they inhabit. Calling to mind Alexander Calder’s mobiles, these pieces provoke not just a visual reaction, but also a physical reaction to the viewer. Operating as kinetic sculpture as much as painting, these images are notable for their geometric compositions, and use of rectilinear form.

     

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