• Live from the Edge of Destruction

    Date posted: December 14, 2007 Author: jolanta
    Wu Rijin, one of the main representatives of super-form visual art, recently finished a set of works entitled “City Series.” Using new visual language, and themes such as co-existing, restraining, destroying, and altering, this set of works concerns the excessiveness of contemporary culture. Combining signs of the city and the wolf totem—representing civilization counterbalancing nature and a contrast between city culture and the natural state—this set of works shows the artist’s cautious and precise attitudes. Rijin uses this contradicting structure to reveal extreme and pure truth, as well as visually display the relationship between the two formations. Image
    Image
    Painting, Nature, Chinese Art, City Life

    Wu Rijin, one of the main representatives of super-form visual art, recently finished a set of works entitled “City Series.” Using new visual language, and themes such as co-existing, restraining, destroying, and altering, this set of works concerns the excessiveness of contemporary culture. Combining signs of the city and the wolf totem—representing civilization counterbalancing nature and a contrast between city culture and the natural state—this set of works shows the artist’s cautious and precise attitudes. Rijin uses this contradicting structure to reveal extreme and pure truth, as well as visually display the relationship between the two formations.

    Wolves are astute, fierce, wild, intellectual, and independent creatures—a totem of mankind. As wolves have actually experienced the process of existing and dying out, it makes mankind feel the fear of the destruction. Through this concrete sign, the artist reveals the excessive greed and non-stop indulgence of the city civilization. He shows the crisis brought about by unchecked progress while expressing that life can exist and avoid destruction. However mankind’s extreme activities and greedy desires also exist, and criticism and appeal become the only method to awaken the senses. Rijin releases anxiety and the uneasiness and shows the chaos of zoology.

    The image of wolf was recently abandoned by most artists, but now through Rijin’s language, this image becomes vivid again. In existing and dying only to be born again, this symbol has both experienced and avoided mankind’s ugliness. Rijin clarifies that although ideology in human nature can be established at any time, it could also be easily destroyed at any time. Conversely natural formation cannot be destroyed, for it sustains the human existence.

    Rijin’s work appropriates notions of established “civilization” and shows the weakness and sadness of human nature. He objectively and effectively repeats the firmness, perseverance, and inviolability of natural formation. His mode is the beginning of destruction.

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