• Heavy Metal

    Date posted: December 12, 2008 Author: jolanta
    Columbus artist Mac Worthington prides himself on customization. Such a mission has resulted in a mass collection of metal sculpted furniture he calls “functional art.” His collection includes coffee tables, dining room sets, desks, food prep tables, end tables, mirrors, clocks, and bars. Shopping Worthington’s “galerie” in Columbus’ Short North Arts District feels similar to shopping a boutique for that one-of-a-kind blouse. People have responded. Worthington has not only been a longtime staple in the Columbus art scene for more than 35 years, his collection has been featured on HGTV’s Offbeat America and Curb Appeal. He also has his work—be it furniture, photography, paintings, or sculpture—on display throughout the U.S. and in Canada, England, France, Italy, Spain, and Germany. Image

    Alicia Kelso is the managing editor of CityScene Magazine, which covers arts and entertainment in the Central Ohio area.

    Image
    Courtesy of the artist.

    I Columbus artist Mac Worthington prides himself on customization. Such a mission has resulted in a mass collection of metal sculpted furniture he calls “functional art.” His collection includes coffee tables, dining room sets, desks, food prep tables, end tables, mirrors, clocks, and bars. Shopping Worthington’s “galerie” in Columbus’ Short North Arts District feels similar to shopping a boutique for that one-of-a-kind blouse.

    People have responded. Worthington has not only been a longtime staple in the Columbus art scene for more than 35 years, his collection has been featured on HGTV’s Offbeat America and Curb Appeal. He also has his work—be it furniture, photography, paintings, or sculpture—on display throughout the U.S. and in Canada, England, France, Italy, Spain, and Germany.

    Aside from his “home collection,” Worthington prides himself on his grandiose outdoor sculptures made mostly of steel and iron. “When I started doing sculpture (in the mid-70s), it pushed off in so many different directions and I connected with it,” Worthington said.

    Consequently, it was the major turning point in his career. But it wasn’t until about ten years ago when he actually started using his artistic welding skills to create customized furniture pieces for his customers. “One of my customers asked me to do a piece they could put on their wall,” Worthington said. “I had no idea where to go with that. But I guess I just got it eventually, and I’m here with it now.”

    Now, even after 35 years behind the easel, his curiosity seems to be piquing. He has embarked upon a new “neon” collection, incorporating light into his sculptures, he continues to paint and shoot photography, which was his original niche, and he has recently opened up his galerie to host more than 400 aspiring Columbus artists who may one day have a resume as prolific as his. “I think it’s important to offer a space for all kinds of artists and their art, for people who may not have had the opportunity to show their work without this space,” Worthington said. “And I think it’s fun to see what all of these artists come up with. I feel like their captain sometimes. My brain spins all the time. I’m always looking for new things to do."

     

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