• Female artists are representing more countries than ever in national pavilions

    Date posted: May 9, 2015 Author: jolanta
    Twitter Image: Cate Blanchett TG ‏@catebblogbr May 5  Cate Blanchett & Fiona Hall - Opening of the Australian Pavilion at Venice Biennale #CateBlanchett #biennaledivenezia
    Twitter Image: Cate Blanchett TG ‏@catebblogbr May 5 Cate Blanchett & Fiona Hall - Opening of the Australian Pavilion at Venice Biennale #CateBlanchett #biennaledivenezia

    Venice Biennale represents rebalancing in the art world

    VENICE (AP) — A Nigerian art critic and museum director is the first African to curate the Biennale contemporary art fair that opens Saturday for its seven-month run, while female artists are representing more countries than ever in national pavilions — trends seen as an informal rebalancing in the art world.

    Russian artist Irina Nakhova poses next to a futuristic sculpture of a head of a pilot inside her installation 'The Green Pavilion' on display at the Russian pavilion at the 2015 Biennale of Arts in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Photo: Domenico Stinellis, AP

    Russian artist Irina Nakhova poses next to a futuristic sculpture of a head of a pilot inside her installation ‘The Green Pavilion’ on display at the Russian pavilion at the 2015 Biennale of Arts in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Photo: Domenico Stinellis, AP

    There’s Joan Jonas for the United States, Fiona Hall for Australia, Irina Nakhova for Russia, Sarah Lucas for Great Britain, Chiharu Shiota for Japan, Pamela Rosenkranz for Switzerland and Camille Norment for Norway. And those women are all from the more established Biennale participants in the Giardini, around one-third of the 89 national pavilions.

    British artist Sarah Lucas poses next to her sculpture 'Gold Cup Maradona' part of her installation 'I Scream Daddio' at the British pavilion at the 2015 Biennale of Arts in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Photo: Domenico Stinellis, AP

    British artist Sarah Lucas poses next to her sculpture ‘Gold Cup Maradona’ part of her installation ‘I Scream Daddio’ at the British pavilion at the 2015 Biennale of Arts in Venice, Italy, Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Photo: Domenico Stinellis, AP

    The prominence of women in the national pavilions — which along with the main show curated by Okwui Enwezor comprise the 56th International Art Exhibition — may be coincidence. Still, the force of the female numbers is gaining notice as somehow tapping into a zeitgeist and challenging the notion of the art world as being male dominated.

    “I think it is wonderful so many women are representing countries this year. I think it is great,” Jonas said, sitting outside the U.S. pavilion — where she had just been approached by a woman who thanked her for giving hope to female artists.

    JoanJonasatMITPhotobyLBarryHetherington2014_CP

    Jonas started her artistic career as a sculptor in the 1960s before moving into performance art and becoming an early adapter to video in the 1970s. She said that her participation in the Biennale would bring “a lot more attention to my work” — while adding that she always felt supported.

    “I am an artist’s artist. From the very beginning, I had an audience. From the very beginning, I felt appreciated,” she said. “I couldn’t continue to work like this if I didn’t have the support of my fellow artists, and then many curators, over the years.”

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