• Dismantled Lucidity

    Date posted: October 20, 2008 Author: jolanta
    Since 2004, the three of us have wanted to work on a project about the human body. The Translucence series finally materialized in 2006, shaped by our fascination/obsession with bodies and classical art. When UNMASK originated, we each adopted a character meant to represent idealized versions of our actual physical forms. Through these disguises we tackled the subject matters and events that held meaning for us. The subsequent works, Do you know UNMASK and The Invisible, explore the complex issues surrounding self-identity. Image

    UNMASK

    Image
    UNMASK, Translucence No. 2 and No. 8, 2008. Installation shot at ChinaSquare New York. Courtesy of ChinaSquare New York.

    Since 2004, the three of us have wanted to work on a project about the human body. The Translucence series finally materialized in 2006, shaped by our fascination/obsession with bodies and classical art.

    When UNMASK originated, we each adopted a character meant to represent idealized versions of our actual physical forms. Through these disguises we tackled the subject matters and events that held meaning for us. The subsequent works, Do you know UNMASK and The Invisible, explore the complex issues surrounding self-identity. Compared to these ambitious works, the Translucence series is much simpler in its goal of conveying our adoration for the beauty of the human body.

    The concept of self-simulation is not as obvious in Translucence, though the technique of incorporating different bodies in our art continues to be a significant aspect of UNMASK’s evolution. After all, we indulge ourselves in the practice of reconstructing ourselves and will never get tired of it. This method led us through a process of refining the complicated narratives in our sculptures. The shards of fragmented bodies—at once vulnerable and sharp—come together in varying dimensions to complete a surreal void. In this show we aimed to challenge the conventions of sculpture through simplifying the structure of the human form, while enhancing intricate elements like eyelashes and fingernails. By doing so, we hoped to intensify the visual impact of the contrast between minimizing the general and defining the minute. The resulting sculptures are evidence that we have achieved our goal. 

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