• Dirty Silhouettes

    Date posted: March 10, 2010 Author: jolanta
    My work is driven by the desire to understand and interpret the human condition, human dynamics/relationships by exploring the “spaces in between.” I find myself constantly needing to defy the canvas edge and envelope the space beyond the boundaries, incorporating into the images elements of truth and fiction such as text, collage, and assemblage in both a serious and playful manner. Through this process I offer psychologically charged explorations of these complex relationships and in doing so, draw the viewer into a provocative world of sexual politics.

    Sue Williams

    Sue Williams, Dare U Play, 2008. Charcoal and ink on paper, 152 cm x 122 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

    My work is driven by the desire to understand and interpret the human condition, human dynamics/relationships by exploring the “spaces in between.” I find myself constantly needing to defy the canvas edge and envelope the space beyond the boundaries, incorporating into the images elements of truth and fiction such as text, collage, and assemblage in both a serious and playful manner. Through this process I offer psychologically charged explorations of these complex relationships and in doing so, draw the viewer into a provocative world of sexual politics. The background against which these portrayed relationships take place, the stage, is the domestic—in the kitchen, living room, and the bedroom, or in public spaces such as bar, clubs, shopping malls, and streets.

    Drawing is used as an urgent and immediate tool for visualizing my responses, allowing the opportunity to deconstruct relationships through memory and reassessment, and at the same time convey meaning at both the political and private level. Responses are drawn from both fantasy and reality, deliberately teasing and questioning the notion of self/identity, both sexual and cerebral.

    My work challenges the perception of gender, but more importantly of the human condition in contemporary, consumerist society, revealing an ambiguous boundary between a secure place and an insecure place, the real and the imagined. I cannot call myself purely a “painter” as my vision extends into other art forms. Most recently I co-directed SHH!, a visually stimulating piece of theater installation, based on the recurring themes of communication. I took this opportunity to see the theater space as a bare canvas revealing a virtual house with invisible boundaries and a game played between two players in a dysfunctional relationship, both striving to win.

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