• Being Bumblebee

    Date posted: May 27, 2009 Author: jolanta
    We all manoeuvre ourselves through life with the help of rational and emotional decisions, trying to find a meaning and a way to deal with the unknown and the inevitable. I too have this pursuit of knowledge, and art is for me the best way to learn. With different mediums, my work is about understanding and discovery often through trial and failure. Like a scientist I explore different theories and possible combinations forming a material in a way that something else is seen, transforming reality with its own rules, to hopefully discover something new. It’s about possibilities, not solutions. These photographs are from a body of work called It’s easier to let go if you forget about gravity. They are all photographs/documentation of a performance or experiment, inspired by the bumblebee.

    Silja Leifsdottir

     

     

    We all manoeuvre ourselves through life with the help of rational and emotional decisions, trying to find a meaning and a way to deal with the unknown and the inevitable. I too have this pursuit of knowledge, and art is for me the best way to learn.

    With different mediums, my work is about understanding and discovery often through trial and failure. Like a scientist I explore different theories and possible combinations forming a material in a way that something else is seen, transforming reality with its own rules, to hopefully discover something new. It’s about possibilities, not solutions.

    These photographs are from a body of work called It’s easier to let go if you forget about gravity. They are all photographs/documentation of a performance or experiment, inspired by the bumblebee. According to 20th-century folklore, the laws of aerodynamics prove that the bumblebee should be incapable of flight, as it does not have the capacity in terms of wing size or beat per second to fly. Not being aware of scientists “proving” it cannot fly, the bumblebee succeeds under “the power of its own ignorance.” In this body of work, I have explored gravity as a metaphor for reality. Gravity is a force of nature that is just as inevitable as death. It is also responsible for keeping the earth and all the other planets in the orbits around the sun. Without it, life as we know it, would not exist. In spite of this knowledge, mankind have been attempting to conquer this force for centuries, dreaming about weightlessness and the ability to fly. There is an absurd beauty in the attempts to control destiny, and I wonder if mankind could ever survive without the ability to sometimes fully believe in what could be described as irrational thoughts. I believe in a balance of the two, irrationality and rationality, and in this work I’ve attempted to find a perfect balance. The photographs are originally seen in an installation context, with moving sculptures attempting to conquer gravity in different ways, a video installation, and a sound piece.

    My current project explores the Big Bang simulator (LHD) at CERN, Geneva, and black holes, where I attempt to understand and translate scientific theories into a visual form/installation. I hope that my work, my experiments, and discoveries will create a dialogue where viewers ask themselves questions and perhaps even discover something new.

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