• artMRKT Hamptons: Neither Edgy Nor Conservative

    Date posted: July 26, 2011 Author: jolanta

    And as the season of art fairs goes, the summer has well been reserved for Art Hamptons set in Bridgehampton, Long Island. But this year the people of New York had a second reason to take the 2.5 hour drive out East – artMRKT Hamptons. This was the fair’s inaugural year in the Hamptons following their debut in San Francisco earlier this May. 35 galleries participated in the three day affair; the mass majority being American-based.

    “In the booth, subtly materializing in the corner, were small wood-carvings cut into triangular dimensions. It was as if something was behind the walls pushing through. The pieces hung directly into the wall just above eye level.”

    Julie Levesque, Emerging V, 2011. Wood & paint, size variable. Photo Credit: AJ Japour Gallery, Miami Beach, FL. Courtesy of Art Hamptons.

    artMRKT Hamptons: Neither Edgy Nor Conservative

    Janine Noelle

    And as the season of art fairs goes, the summer has well been reserved for Art Hamptons set in Bridgehampton, Long Island. But this year the people of New York had a second reason to take the 2.5 hour drive out East – artMRKT Hamptons. This was the fair’s inaugural year in the Hamptons following their debut in San Francisco earlier this May. 35 galleries participated in the three day affair; the mass majority being American-based.

    This year’s exhibit is a nice balance of size and timing. With a selective roster of galleries; it was concise, clean, and well organized. It was pleasant to walk through each booth and to not feel rushed to visit other events – it was the only thing happening.

    Enter and you were greeted by a VIP lounge, decorated in white leather seats, serving champagne all day. If you were able to pull yourself into the fair, section one housed the names of FOLEYgallery, JHB Gallery, and Fredrick Snitzer Gallery. Move in to section two and you saw the familiar face of Brooklyn gallery, Like the Spice along with a few out-of-towners like that of Florida’s Mindy Solomon Gallery and San Francisco’s Modern Book Collection. Through the final shimmy towards the third section held Randall Scott Projects and Black & White Gallery/Project Space.

    A particular piece that resonated was that of artist Jules Levesque, represented by AJ Japour Gallery. In the booth, subtly materializing in the corner, were small wood-carvings cut into triangular dimensions. It was as if something was behind the walls pushing through. The pieces hung directly into the wall just above eye level. Titled Emerging V (2011), it was a reflection of the artist feeling isolated throughout grade school, thinking that the only way she could survive was if she blended into the wall.

    A few installations and a few sculptures were exhibited, but the booths mainly showcased the mediums of photography and painting. Neither too edgy nor conservative, the works were as fresh and engaging as the fair itself.

     

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