• Andreas Sell

    Date posted: August 9, 2010 Author: jolanta
    At a selected point in the exhibition room, either Andreas Sell, himself, or actors hired by him, stand still for hours. This type of exhibition turns the human body into art/the exhibition. The artist uses the act of standing in the exhibition/being the exhibition as a display of his disruption to the traditional experience of an art exhibition. This work is enhanced by the presentation of the exhibit 60 Years of Chinese Fine Arts at the National Art Museum of China. Andreas Sell’s approach does not create a predominantly contextual relation to other exhibition objects. His sculpture reflects the role of the audience, and captures an action: standing and remaining in the art exhibit. The certainty that the living “sculpture” may move at any moment creates an anticipation….

    Anna Fäser

    Andreas Sell, Standstill, intervention: 1 hour, at the exhibition of 60 Years of Chinese Fine Arts at the National Museum of Art, Beijing. Courtesy of the artist.

    At a selected point in the exhibition room, either Andreas Sell, himself, or actors hired by him, stand still for hours. This type of exhibition turns the human body into art/the exhibition. The artist uses the act of standing in the exhibition/being the exhibition as a display of his disruption to the traditional experience of an art exhibition. This work is enhanced by the presentation of the exhibit 60 Years of Chinese Fine Arts at the National Art Museum of China.


    Andreas Sell’s approach does not create a predominantly contextual relation to other exhibition objects. His sculpture reflects the role of the audience, and captures an action: standing and remaining in the art exhibit. The certainty that the living “sculpture” may move at any moment creates an anticipation and tension between the observer and the observed, thereby blurring the otherwise clearly defined, passive relationship between artwork and observer.


    This intervention has a maximal effect, despite the actual minimal nature of its gesture. The conventional practice of looking at art is interrupted. Especially the part of the observer is displaced by the act of standing still. The standing actor becomes an “intermediate person”, an observer artwork, and extends the perception of what the sculpture is. With this “still” action, Andreas Sell takes an analytical look at the coordinates of artwork, as well as at the entire institutional framework.

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