• Adaptations of Art

    Date posted: May 27, 2009 Author: jolanta
    There is no authenticity, there is no truth, and there is no interpretation. This is what I believe in art at present. Repeated by borrowing, imitating, and deforming, contemporary art in the 21st century seems difficult to differentiate in between genres, except for a slight hint of visual presentation. The allegorical relation to my work is quite essential: the collected and rearranged images and objects distort their intrinsic attributes, creating new interpretations in which we are often bewildered. While the collected images and objects provide us clues to directions for new semiotic process and structure in work, this new process and structure tend to be easily neglected because it starts from very tiny partial hints of a piece that can be representative of the whole, like a fractal. The symbolic language in work with personal historicity cannot be something easily earned by everyone.

    MinJi Kim

    There is no authenticity, there is no truth, and there is no interpretation. This is what I believe in art at present. Repeated by borrowing, imitating, and deforming, contemporary art in the 21st century seems difficult to differentiate in between genres, except for a slight hint of visual presentation. The allegorical relation to my work is quite essential: the collected and rearranged images and objects distort their intrinsic attributes, creating new interpretations in which we are often bewildered. While the collected images and objects provide us clues to directions for new semiotic process and structure in work, this new process and structure tend to be easily neglected because it starts from very tiny partial hints of a piece that can be representative of the whole, like a fractal. The symbolic language in work with personal historicity cannot be something easily earned by everyone. I suspect that this ambiguous language may create inexplicable mysteries of art in toto, and the mysteries contribute to form an artistic aura of the work.

    As an installation artist, the eternity of art exists in another form. The dispute on disposable art is no longer new. Supposing the limit of the documentation form of installation works lies beneath only inconvenience of tactile experience on visual, it is the most natural artistic medium along with mortality of human beings; like mementos, materiality becomes words and translated into text and one’s memory after all. There are two formal/methodical aspects of my work, although most works are deeply connected with given spaces. One is an “open” form, and the other is a “closed” one. The “open” work is physically big and scattered. Derived from one idea, objects and languages are placed seemingly irrelevant to each other. Each element shouts with a common denominator, but it eventually makes new language and interpretation. The dynamics with space should control the restraint of shout from each so; if it is neglected, the artist’s intention gets lost in artificial/compulsory interpretations. In “closed” works, the diverse ideas are expressed in one condensed mass. Each symbolic object deprived of its attribute permeates into new content of gestalts. Yet this, as a strong poetic language mingled with different materiality, can cause various subjective interpretations. Both engender a third narrative. The meta-textual third narrative related to content, concept, form, structure, and space is what I investigate in art now.

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