• Autodidactic Erotic

    Date posted: June 13, 2008 Author: jolanta
    My work has been called auto-bio-erotic photography, which seems a fitting title, as my series of self-portraits pursues surreal, dreamlike visuals with a sultry eroticism. The fundamental ideas that fuel my work are those of reconstruction and transformation. While I am often exploring erotic themes, this work is at times both symbolic and literal, touching on areas that are dark, yet innocent. All these facets are part of my work as they are also a part of my thought process and personality. I photograph myself to explore themes such as my sense of self and who I can become. I’m influenced by dreams and memory, which for me operate like fantastical erotic film stills. I examine ideas that touch upon myth and ephemeral moments as well as decadent and dangerous tales. Image

    Erin Frost’s photographs were on view at The Museum of Porn in Art, Zurich, Switzerland in May and at Some Space Gallery in Seattle, Washington, in June.

    Image
    Erin Frost, Self Portrait/Collar, 2007. Silver gelatin print, 20 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

    My work has been called auto-bio-erotic photography, which seems a fitting title, as my series of self-portraits pursues surreal, dreamlike visuals with a sultry eroticism. The fundamental ideas that fuel my work are those of reconstruction and transformation. While I am often exploring erotic themes, this work is at times both symbolic and literal, touching on areas that are dark, yet innocent. All these facets are part of my work as they are also a part of my thought process and personality.

    I photograph myself to explore themes such as my sense of self and who I can become. I’m influenced by dreams and memory, which for me operate like fantastical erotic film stills. I examine ideas that touch upon myth and ephemeral moments as well as decadent and dangerous tales.

    There’s something about working entirely autonomously that strips away all the distractions and boundaries involved in a shoot with other people; it becomes almost meditative. There isn’t the traditional divide between artist and model. Erasing this separation allows for an authenticity—an intimacy—that couldn’t be captured working with someone else.

    I’ve come to enjoy the restrictions involved. It’s just me with my camera. I really have to stretch sometimes to come up with something new, a new way of seeing the same thing. I challenge myself to perpetually change in this way. And because of this, things often turn in a different direction than I ever could have anticipated. My work is made traditionally as well (film and darkroom) with no outside manipulation. So it’s exciting to push past self-imposed ideas about something as basic as how to shoot a roll of film. Some of my work has involved in-camera collage. I also frequently work with mirrors to alter things and find a new perspective.

    Once I started seriously pursuing self-portraits, there really wasn’t any turning back. The whole process of photography has changed for me. It’s become an experiment in intuition. Since I don’t look through the camera when I’m shooting, I imagine what it looks like, but I don’t see it until after the fact. I’ve had to relinquish control, let it unfold, allowing myself to become part of the process.

    www.erinfrostphotography.com

    Comments are closed.